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Architecture

ODASA Pavilion

About

ODASA Pavilion is the embodiment of applying Agile methodologies into digital design and fabrication. It uses a nonstandard design process that focuses on first developing and refining an immaterial system prior to applying the system to a design brief. The process seeks to delay materialisation to create an adaptable system. The benefits of the nonstandard design process is to enable designers with a flexible system that caters to contextual, material and environmental conditions of the project during the design process.

The process was tested in a series of three workshops to design and fabricate a pavilion for the Office of Design and Architecture South Australia (ODASA) in Adelaide to coincide with the Australian Institute of Architecture’s National Conference.

In this third workshop the AGILE X3, ODASA Pavilion was fabricated in an easily demountable structure with intermittent flyscreen panels. The workshop was led by Dr Tim McGinley and consisted of architecture and engineering students from University of South Australia.

The pavilion weighed approximately 140kgs and the arch spans a distance of approximately 4.5 metres. It was semi-constructed as 8 manageable sections, transported to the site and assembled in a day.

Project Details

Team Tim McGinley, Agile X Research Group, AX3 Participants
Year 2016
Client The Office for Design and Architecture SA
Location Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Awards 2017 South Australian Architecture Awards, Small Project Architecture Commendation

World Economic Forum

About
Red Hong Yi is an international artist who ‘paints without a brush’ and is known to create artworks using everyday objects. In 2015, she was commissioned to represent Malaysian culture as an artwork at the World Economic Forum. For the showcase, she chose to use 20,000 tea bags to illustrate the ‘Teh Tarik Man’, the Malaysian barista.

As Hong Yi says, “Perhaps more important than the drink itself is the underlying culture. Locals gather in kopitiams and mamaks, and here they talk about where to buy the best durians, the traffic, politics, weather, soccer… It is a drink that brings people together.”

To realise her artistic vision, I worked with One Design Office to plan the construction and assembly of the installation. Photographs of the ‘Tarik Man’ were taken, pixelated and mapped onto a grid to build the installation in segments.

The photograph was manipulated to determine the quantity of each dyed tea bag and instructions on how the tea bags were arranged and assembled were created.

The design took 10 days and the fabrication and assembly process took over two months. The artwork weighed over 200kg with a size of 3.2 x 2.2 metres.

Project Details

Team One Design Office
Year 2014
Client Red Hongyi
Location Davos-Klosters, Switzerland

Next Lab

About

The NExT Lab is an exciting dynamic environment for engaging with and learning about cutting-edge technology, allowing users to experience revolutionary ways to explore their ideas and translate them into reality.

It houses a cluster of 32 3D printers and offers 3d printing service to the University of Melbourne. Users submit jobs remotely to a centrally managed 3D printing cluster that is open and visible to the public.

The lab acts as a participatory “gallery” for experiencing new technology, provoking larger conversations about the future and technologies part in it. Throughout the day passers-by will be able to observe the highly visible bank of 3D printers producing models, along with dynamic and advanced digital imagery projected on the wall providing constant visual excitement and attraction.

The NExT Lab is also easily reconfigured to host small events, educational sessions and demonstrations. These events are facilitated by a Video Wall for presenting digital content.

Project Details

Team MSD Fabrication Workshop
Year 2016
Client Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne
Location Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Makerspace

About

TBA

Project Details

Team MSD Fabrication Workshop
Year 2016
Client Melbourne School of Design, University of Melbourne
Location Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Tower of Knowledge

About
The Tower of Knowledge proposes a theatrical celebration of 100 years of engineering in Australia through the construction and re-construction of a tower structure, moving from form into landscape. The inverted tower as stage appropriates and occupies existing features of the Arboretum over a curated event encompassing 100 days of scenes and projects which aim to engage the community of engineers in a project of memory and growth.

The Tower of Knowledge celebrates human ingenuity in manipulating materials and structures to progress occupation of the Australian landscape over time. The curated program builds upon familiar processes and events that shape the Canberra landscape. These qualities are potently present in the TCL curated landscapes of the Canberra Arboretum, and our proposal seeks to continue this trajectory to provoke new and future performances for the community, played out in this iconic site. The form of the cast tower is strangely familiar – appearing as it does in homage to the compelling fire towers that look out across the landscapes of Australia to warn of impending trouble on the horizon.

The tower is clearly monumental; in one guise representing the memory of the last 100 years of engineering innovation stored inside the walls of the lofty tower. Then, in its re-de-constructed form it becomes an embedded history lain across and growing up from the earth from which the Pin Oak Forest and its clearings convey the presence and care of the profession of Engineers.

Project Details

Team Prof Alan Pert, Prof Gini Lee, Caroline Chong, Dhanika Kumaheri, Louise Turner
Year 2014
Location National Arboretum Canberra, Australia
Exhibition
 
Engineers Australia Convention 2014
Village Centre, National Arboretum Canberra

Etched in Memory

About
The rich traditions of carving are being explored in the context of a new landscape forming a memorial for the Canterbury Earthquakes. As an art form and an essential sacred form of cultural expression, this carved landscape will evolve as part of a living culture reflecting the stories of individuals, the people of Christchurch and the culture of the city. An elevated circular gathering space forms the heart of the site (The ‘Memorial Island’). The circular gathering space is an abstraction of the sun but also the moon. The surface of the gathering space is charcoal black and punctured only by the 185 small lights that mark the columns below and 4,199 perforations for water to pass through. At the same time each day (12.51pm) a wall of water connects the raised gathering space with the river.

Beyond the water lies a forest of 185, blackened trees, which support the gathering space above. These trees represent 185 people who lost their lives but they are not static memorial objects, instead they are active performative pieces supporting the structure and the people above. These trees are carved with messages, motifs and names acting as records of a previous life and telling the story of an individual’s life. Just as traditional Maori Carving was used to record the ancestors, this forest of carved trees reflects a specific history and culture unique to New Zealand. The black ‘forest’ also provides private space within the site. Just like wondering into the quiet of a dense forest this space is peaceful, private and more suited to individual contemplation and quiet reflection

Project Details

Team Prof Alan Pert, James Selleck, Caroline Chong
Year 2014
Location Christchurch, New Zealand