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Teaching

I am a designer with a passion for teaching design and business in a design studio format.
I enjoy helping students develop their conceptual thinking and engaging with them has proven to be a rewarding experience for me. I actively listen to students and am always looking to improve their learning experience.

Teaching Philosophy

Design studios provide opportunities for investigating and proposing alternative modes of design not widely used in our profession. They promote an environment for risk-taking and stretching creativity to its limits. For studio participants, they serve as a safe haven where minds can be challenged and brave ideas can be shared.

Working in a design studio is a daunting yet rewarding experience; it should be encouraged and trained in prospective designers so they are well prepared to face industry challenges. My goal as a teacher is to facilitate designers’ ideas from concept to fruition. I engage students in learning through making, technical upskilling and encouraging self-reflection whenever possible.

As Benjamin Franklin famously said, “by failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

As such, I take meticulous care in preparing design programmes, lesson plans and regularly reassess how design is taught. Student’s working styles differ and I actively promote open communication between participants and myself to foster improvements in their design education and studio experience.

Curriculum Development

An important factor in teaching design is content: A well-paced and organised lesson contributes to a positive learning experience for the students. Coupled with engaging guides and references for learning outside the studio context, the design programme can invigorate students and inspire them to achieve higher goals.

In my lesson plans, I provide a balance of creative and rational design processes that cater to different types of designers

Learning through making

The ’sage on the stage’ approach to teaching design is directly oppositional to the participatory nature of design and the evolution of university education. Students should start by pursuing what they want to master; materialising designs, communicating ideas with built designs, engaging with the building process and more.

This prototyping approach has always taken centre stage in my teaching methods. Show me, don’t tell me.

Risk-taking learning

Designers must be confident working with risk to address complex industry challenges and provide innovative solutions. Risk taking is important and necessary.

I help my students to expand their design scope and engage with risk by challenging them to observe and incorporate processes from fields outside of design.

Technical Upskilling

Upskilling students’ technical skills is necessary for them to improve their productivity in design tasks. Achieving proficiency frees up more time for them to prioritise other design work, be more productive, and get much-needed rest.

I teach students various visual communication techniques, develop courses on 3D modelling and graphic software and create self-guided references for students to learn and use digital fabrication techniques in their design projects.

Previous  Teaching

Material Mutation

Future Forward Thinking
Can the living replace the non-living? Can the natural replace the artificial? Can structures be grown?
About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Digital Design
Date August 2018
Client Swinburne University of Technology
Team Ravi Bessabava
Location Melbourne, Australia

BioDigital Futures

About
Can the living replace the non-living? Can the natural replace the artificial? Can structures be grown?

The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.

Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture, Digital Design
Date July 2018

Client

Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia
Swinburne University of Technology
Team Canhui Chen, Tracey Quynh, John Sadar
Location Melbourne, Australia

Agile X4

About
Can the living replace the non-living? Can the natural replace the artificial? Can structures be grown?

The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.

Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture, Digital Design
Date July 2018

Client

Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia
Swinburne University of Technology
Team Canhui Chen, Tracey Quynh, John Sadar
Location Melbourne, Australia

Design Startup

About
"Today everything has been broken, the system of the economy, the system of the technique, the system of the way of thinking. Architecture is much more than building, it is dealing with complex problems." – Odile Decq

This studio questions the role of the future architect by asking, “is our current business service model, established 50 years ago, sufficient to sustain our profession for the next 50 years?”

Learn more

Since everything is broken, are our architecture services still reliable? As risk takers and design futurists, we approach new projects by embracing the unknown. Yet, our business model has been conservative and is only seeing cautious changes to explore our ever-changing economy.

This semester, we will examine our definition of shelter, workspaces and how we socialise in a knowledge-based economy. We will explore problems related to the shifting attitudes of our environment and ideate on how architectural interventions can relieve these problems. We will constantly challenge our interventions as a product, service and platform in order to encourage continuity after it has been deployed.

This studio situates itself between creative designers and business developers. We examine architecture using human-centred design and business development as a self-referential workflow. We see economic feasibility not as a force of resistance but as a creative driver. We ask students to use their architectural skills to create business opportunities to jumpstart their careers.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture, Business
Date March 2017
Client University of Melbourne
Team Yee Kee Ku
Location Melbourne, Australia

Digital Design & Fabrication

About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Digital Design
Date July 2018
Client University of Melbourne
Team Paul Loh, Annie Walsh
Location Melbourne, Australia

Design Studio Earth

About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture
Date August 2014
Client University of Melbourne
Team Prof Alex Selenitsch
Location Melbourne, Australia

Digital Documentation

About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture
Date August 2018
Client Swinburne University of Technology
Team Canhui Chen
Location Melbourne, Australia

Design Workshop

About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture
Date August 2014
Client University of Melbourne
Team Prof Alex Selenitsch
Location Melbourne, Australia

Visual Communications

About
The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC) Global Summer School Melbourne node seeks future solutions to the environmental impact of a world of cities developing at unprecedented growth rates. Support systems struggle to keep up with demand. Existing built environment and manufacturing models exploit natural resources, physical and biological.
Learn more

It is imperative to seek a new paradigm that finds an equilibrium between the natural and the artificial in an effort to reduce non-renewable consumption. As designers and architects, the decision to ‘make’ often has a two-fold side-effect of consuming resources and harming the environment. Therefore, how do we make and what can we make that mitigates these side-effects. Can we build and manufacture with low energy processes? Can we make with renewable materials? Can buildings be grown, with open processes that embrace the variability of the natural world?

This IaaC GSS node will take a multidisciplinary approach and draw inspiration, technology and knowledge from biology, algorithmic design and digital fabrication.

Alternative biological materials will form the base materials for building and making. Participants will collaborate with biologists, designers and architects to conduct research, experiment with biomaterials and explore their fabrication potential. Participants will use parametric design tools and computational modelling techniques to investigate geometric solutions, inspired by biology – such as growth patterns and micro-structures – in developing scaffolds and moulds that support the growth of biomaterials.

The Melbourne IaaC GSS node invites applicants from diverse fields and backgrounds who share a common interest in multidisciplinary learning in design and biology, and are interested in design experimentation and speculation through cultivation, coding, and making to explore low energy, renewable and living alternatives to building and manufacturing.

Project Details

Type Teaching, Architecture
Date August 2014
Client University of Melbourne
Team Lindy Joubert
Location Melbourne, Australia